Category Archives: Breeder Bios

Hello from Stoney Brook!

Hello Everyone,

I wanted to introduce Stoney Brook Outfitters. We are from the great state of Wisconsin.

We are more focused on hunting than breeding. The majority of our hunting consists of hunting Ruffed Grouse and Woodcock in Wisconsin. We also spend around 90 days a year taking advantage of 10,000 acres of public land groomed for Prairie Chickens in Central Wisconsin. To start our hunting season, we take an annual trip to South Dakota to hunt Prairie Chickens and Sharptails. Occasionally we will also hunt quail, pheasants, ducks and geese too. The majority of our work surrounds the kennel and training all dogs from hunting to obedience to service dogs. We have three Rymans (and a couple Pointers and a Lab) and are getting ready for our second litter of Rymans this spring.

Feel free to ask questions if you have them!

 

Rum Creek Setters

Life with English Setters for me was prompted by an article in the 1980’s by long-time outdoors writer Tom Opre. His description of the traits of English Setters still make them a special breed today. My first setter, Sadie, was from Jagerlust Setters in Holly, Michigan and she set the bar for the future. The quest to keep these great hunters and companions in the field has been the objective of Rum Creek Setters.

With Sundog Aspen Glow and Pine Coble Reed from Baypines Kennels as the foundation of our breeding program, four outstanding litters have kept this legacy going strong. Rum Creek Autumn Bliss, with a heavy Pinecoble pedigree, has produced puppies that are described as hard pointers, great noses, athletic, sweet, smart and close working. Offspring that have had hips checked have all been OFA Excellent or Good. My trusty vet, Randy Carpenter, says that he wishes all of his dogs would have hips that look as good as these.

While we primarily hunt grouse and woodcock, these dogs have hunted pheasant, chucker, quail, huns, and sharptail in various setting with excellent results by their owners. Their disposition makes them desirable for hunters and families to enjoy for many years.

Mark Altemann

Baypines Setters

Mike with Jennie and Hattie
Mike with Jennie and Hattie

I have had setters all my life, and acquired my first Ryman-type in 1975. My current setters are mainly Pinecoble lines.

Kate
Kate

I’ve also been a practising veterinarian since 1975. I am interested in and see lots of working dogs from all over the state of Michigan. I see many OFA films from these dogs and know the importance of good health screening in hunting dogs. I only breed sires and dams that are OFA Good or Excellent.

Baypines Jenny
Baypines Jenny
Pincoble Reed
Pincoble Reed

My setters are hunted on wild birds about 50 days annually. At least 40 of those days are on Grouse and Woodcock, and they also see prairie birds.

Baypines Puppies
Baypines Puppies

I usually breed only when I need a pup, so the litters are planned to produce the kind of hunting dog I want. Males are 50 to 60 lbs, females around 50 lbs. They are healthy, staunch, happy grouse dogs. Mike McDonald

Mother and Daughter
Mother and Daughter

Old Hemlock Setters

Old Hemlock Setters

Old Hemlock Setters are a line of English Setters developed by George and Kay Evans using a dog obtained from George Ryman, Old Hemlock Blue, and then breeding for the type. The Evanses were looking for a companion gun dog for primarily grouse and woodcock hunting. Old Hemlock Setters are often referred to as belton setters, but belton is a color: blue belton, orange belton or tri-belton. On page 224 of the Upland Shooting Life George describes the line of dogs: “In our Old Hemlock line we have developed a handsome belton type averaging fifty-five pounds for the males, under fifty for the females, with a deep muzzle, a typical long, fine-boned head. They hunt almost daily through our long grouse seasons in roughest cover, and they are natural gun dogs with nose and style. They are companion gun dogs that hunt to the extent of bell range and have the fire and drive necessary to find birds but hunt for and check in with the gunner.”

In 1998 by George’s request the line was passed to Roger Brown who knew the line of dogs well and had Old Hemlock Setters since 1973. Roger Brown and Jeff Kauffman continue the line and produce one or two litters a year. Like George and Kay Evans they do not keep a kennel of brood bitches. Rather the dogs are co-owned; something George and Kay did to have control of all breeding of their line of dogs. The setters live with their families as companion gun dogs and see a lot of hunting. The sires and dams are OFA certified for hips and elbows and proven in the field as hunting dogs.

All of our Old Hemlock Puppies are placed with Joint Ownership! This practice George and Kay Evans instituted to ensure that the puppy contract was followed. Prior to joint ownership, people violated the contract. We have continued this practice of joint ownerships to ensure the agreements are followed. This practice makes sure that Old Hemlock Setters bred have passed the proper health tests, and represent the type and style of dogs which we want to produce.

If you are interested in joining the Old Hemlock Family and obtaining one of these setters, you can contact Roger Brown at 740-567-3569 or email at rcbrown@oldhemlock.org .

Frequently Asked Questions
Link to answers about obtaining an OH Setter

Classic Setters

We were first introduced to Ryman type setters by Walt Cottrell and Walt Saling and got our first two setters from them in the early 1980’s. We began breeding setters several years later and average 1 litter per year.

Our focus from the beginning was to line breed Ryman and Old Hemlock bloodlines with strategic outcrosses to Llewellyn setters. These outcrosses have produced some of our best dogs and when linebred back into our lines produce remarkably uniform litters with the traits we are looking for. We believe you cannot maintain a line without periodic outcrosses!

We emphasize natural hunting ability, good conformation and health, and biddability. Our dogs begin hunting ruffed grouse and woodcock but we hunt pheasants, prairie grouse, and quail as well. They generally begin hunting after only basic obedience training and quickly begin pointing and retrieving when exposed to birds, and because they are so easy to handle, you can adjust their range to remain close in grouse and woodcock covers and let them open up on the prairies.

Fran and Frank Thompson
email
www.Classicenglishsetters.com